Fatigue Management For Weight Lifting

 

Utilizing this graph, will help you effectively plan your workouts for optimal results!
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Training Stimulus: This happens when you’re in the gym and lifting weights. Your muscles are being broken down at this point. Many people believe your muscles grow in the gym when in fact the opposite is true.
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Fatigue: This part refers to after your training session when your muscles have just been used and are “tired” from the stimulus.
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Recovery: When you’re body starts to adapt to the training stimulus and fatigue produced during the training session. This part is critical for muscle growth and strength gain. Out of all the parts, this is where your gains can be maximized or lost completely. This is also why you can’t just double what you do in the gym or workout 4 hours a day, 7 days per week and expect double the results. Your body won’t be able to recover effectively from that. In fact, it would likely get weaker because of such a high recovery demand.
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Supercompensation: This is where your body has completed the recovery from the training session and has adapted to the stimulus. Hence, you get bigger and/or stronger.
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Involution: If you don’t continually challenge the body, it will atrophy and lose muscle size as well as strength. This is why it’s critical to try to add weight or volume to movements every week or two.
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In general, bigger (height and weight) and stronger athletes need longer to recover from a workout because of the force produced when lifting. Shorter athletes that weigh less and can’t lift as much weight usually need less recovery time.
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Practical Examples: Someone with a 600lb deadlift who is 6 foot 3 inches tall and weighs 230 pounds would need at least 3-5 days between moderately heavy (~75-85% of 1RM) deadlift sessions. A lifter who is 5 foot 6 inches, weighs 170 pounds, and can deadlift 275 pounds, could deadlift at a moderately heavy (~75-85% of 1RM) weight every 2-3 days because it’s just not as big of a stimulus for the body compared to the 600lb deadlifter. Play around with different frequencies to see what works best for you! 💪


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